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Foschi, Gabriella (2008) Nucleotide metabolism and urate excretion in the Dalmatian dog breed. Other thesis, SLU.

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Abstract

The purpose of this literature study is to give an overview of nitrogen and purine metabolism in general and in particular of the molecular mechanisms for the higher uric acid excretion in Dalmatian dogs. The character portrayed by the Dalmatian breed appears to be connected whit a malfunction within purine metabolism, some studies point at a kidney disease whereas other at a liver disease. Although there is a difference in renal handling of urate between purebred Dalmatians and other breeds, the transport mechanism of urate into hepatic cells is most likely a major contributing factor to the higher excretion of uric acid. Findings of different urine composition between the sexes may in the future give rise to new treatments. The differences in purine metabolism and the typical spots of the Dalmatian dogs appears to be affected by pleiotropy and are both inherited by means of a classic Medelian autosomal pattern. All purebred dogs of this breed are affected and portray a high uric acid excretion; the possible elimination of this trait is unlikely due to pleiotropic interactions. More studies on the subject are needed and are of importance as they provide, within comparative medicine, tools for understanding liver and kidney diseases connected to stone formation.

Item Type: Thesis (Other)
Keywords: uric acid, urolithiasis, Dalmatian, purine metabolism, allopurinol
Subject (faculty): Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science > Dept. of Anatomy and Physiology
Divisions: SLU > Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science
Depositing User: Gabriella Foschi
Date Deposited: 03 Jun 2008
Last Modified: 18 Aug 2015 10:04
URI: http://ex-epsilon.slu.se/id/eprint/2573

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